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The T-Shirt craze

Themed T-shirts are all the rage at camp. In addition to the one manager Jeff Banister had printed for the team with an "every second counts" kind of message, Jonathan Lucroy and catching instructor Hector Ortiz had shirts made for all the catchers in camp with a Wolfpack logo on the front and a "Here to Serve" motto on the back. 

"We are a brotherhood, a fraternity, which is where the wolfpack logo comes from," Lucroy said. "And ultimately, a catcher is here to serve the pitchers."

http://sportsday.dallasnews.com/texas-rangers/rangers/2017/02/21/yu-darvish-will-soon-take-time-story-behind-wolfpack-t-shirts-rangers-spring-training

Customized NFL Cleats Raise Money For Charity

The NFL was a little more colorful this past weekend, as hundreds of players wore logoed customized cleats to raise awareness and money for charity.

Players this season have been expressing their personality and fashion tastes with colorful custom cleats – shoes that would also violate the NFL dress code and draw a fine. For Week 13 of the football season, the NFL called a détente on the shoe wars and concocted “My Cause My Cleats,” a campaign designed to raise awareness for different social causes. More than a third of the league – over 500 players – donned cleats with custom designs representing a charity or cause of their choice.

“While there has always been interest and adoption at the youth level in sports, customized footwear has now taken the main stage in many verticals such as sports with the NFL’s Week 13 efforts or fashion with UGG stores offering the opportunity on their famous boots,” Josh Ellsworth, general manager of Stahls’(asi/88984) CAD-CUT Direct division, tells Counselor. Ellsworth noted the increasing demand for personalization and advances in a number of decoration techniques, including heat printing, direct-to-garment, UV printing and embroidery. “They are helping to drive quality products and, therefore, profitable new sales opportunities for businesses.”

Traditionally, NFL players must wear shoes without brand names and logos (beyond that of the shoe manufacturer) – it’s a fine of $6,076 for first-time infractions and $12,154 for subsequent ones. But the cleats sported by players last week featured all sorts of colorful logos, graphics and designs to raise awareness about issues such as domestic abuse, animal cruelty and rare diseases. NFL Auction has also allowed bidding on the shoes with 100% of the proceeds benefiting respective charities.

Ellsworth says customized footwear meshes well with the promotional product industry because it centers on memorability. “Custom branded shoes can be the next great thing that aligns with a campaign’s goals,” Ellsworth says. “Consider the following opportunities: customized footwear that supports a special cause for a charity run/walk, promotional footwear with a ‘Kick Cancer’ mantra that allows on-demand customization, promotional sneakers for a company’s event staff that will be on their feet all day or even custom shoes with a player’s name, number, or hashtag.”

However, Ellsworth warns that there are challenges to consider. “Footwear does bring in an element of sizing, so inventory risk for print on demand or in advance promotional opportunities can be costly,” he says. “The shoe fits when you have a good understanding of exactly who your customer is and what size they want.”

Here’s a look at several of the cleat designs that were worn by the players.

Promo Items for Pilgrims

In the months leading up to the Catholic Church’s World Youth Day 2016, preparations were as globe-spanning as the millions of expected attendees. First instituted in 1986 by Pope Saint John Paul II, World Youth Days (WYD) are hosted every three years by the Vatican and the incumbent Pope, and welcome droves of young people to a week-long faith celebration in a different city. The July 2016 event was held in Krakow, Poland.

Vatican representatives had a good idea of what they wanted for the attendees, known as “pilgrims,” who would eventually converge on Krakow from all over the world. For example, organizers wanted to include ponchos that could also double as ground blankets. So the organizers teamed up with their distributor partner and came up with an item made of a special fabric that not only protected wearers from the rain, but was both soft and durable enough to sit on. In addition, a dye-sublimated scarf was constructed of absorbent microfiber so that it doubled as a towel. 


Each item was color-matched, and the items came in red, blue and yellow. In addition to the ponchos and scarves, other WYD-branded items included backpacks, neck gaiters and silicone bracelets. The finished items were flown to the Polish port city of Gdansk, then trucked more than 350 miles to a warehouse in the Krakow area specially built for WYD, which also housed food and water for 2.5 million pilgrims that attended the successful event.

Interactive Alex Ovechkin Bobblehead Has Staying Power

Washington Capitals winger Alex Ovechkin is quite a hockey player. Not only has "Ovi" amassed nearly 1,000 NHL points in just over 11 seasons, but he's internationally recognized as one of the game's most talented and popular players. So admired is the Russian-born Ovechkin that his likeness is frequently etched on bobbleheads and given away as part of Washington Capital promotions, with this season being no exception.

However, this year’s bobblehead is a little different.

Included in this bobblehead statue giveaway – part of a promotion that encourages multi-game ticket purchases – is a clever Ovi “Career Points” counter at the base that can be manually updated each time a point is scored. So as the winger draws nearer to the vaunted 1,000-point club, fans can tick off the points in real-time!

What makes this small, but not insignificant, feature brilliant is that it transforms a traditional bobblehead from a somewhat boring collectible item, usually stored in dark closets and display cases, to an interactive one that commands attention. People are going to want to display this item prominently in their home theaters, man (and woman) caves, desks and offices.

And as Ovi continues to score points well past 1,000 – he’s still in his prime at 31 and could play another 10 years – this item will prove to have far more staying power and promotional impact than any traditional bobblehead ever could.

Pets Big Part of Harley Davidson Brand

Harley-Davidson has a longstanding brand connection with pets, dating back to 1914 when Miss Della Crewe drove cross-country on a Harley accompanied by her Boston bulldog, Trouble, in the sidecar sporting a special custom sweater.

“To us, dog is family, and Harley-Davidson is a family-oriented brand,” says Jodi Politowski, motor clothes manager at the House of Harley Davidson in Milwaukee. The company also has a strong relationship with the Humane Society and sponsors many pet-oriented events and fundraisers to support that partnership.

Pets are welcome at all of the company’s showroom locations, with pet bowls and treats available for furry friends, as well as an array of themed merchandise. Initially Harley-Davidson offered collars and leashes, but eventually its exclusive supplier, Coastal Pet Products, recognized it should expand its pet product offerings, according to Politowski.

“Harley riders are passionate about our product,” she says. “Many will come in when they get a new dog to have it fitted for a Harley-Davidson collar, and some even pick Harley-related names for their animals.”

Harley-themed pet merchandise is available for sale on the company website www.houseofharley.com as well as in showrooms and at Harley-sponsored events. Its best sellers are its leather-spiked collars, pet apparel for smaller dogs and a pet fleece hoodie, according to Politowski.

Customized NFL Cleats Raise Money For Charity

The NFL was a little more colorful this past weekend, as hundreds of players wore logoed customized cleats to raise awareness and money for charity.

Players this season have been expressing their personality and fashion tastes with colorful custom cleats – shoes that would also violate the NFL dress code and draw a fine. For Week 13 of the football season, the NFL called a détente on the shoe wars and concocted “My Cause My Cleats,” a campaign designed to raise awareness for different social causes. More than a third of the league – over 500 players – donned cleats with custom designs representing a charity or cause of their choice.

“While there has always been interest and adoption at the youth level in sports, customized footwear has now taken the main stage in many verticals such as sports with the NFL’s Week 13 efforts or fashion with UGG stores offering the opportunity on their famous boots,” Josh Ellsworth, general manager of Stahls’(asi/88984) CAD-CUT Direct division, tells Counselor. Ellsworth noted the increasing demand for personalization and advances in a number of decoration techniques, including heat printing, direct-to-garment, UV printing and embroidery. “They are helping to drive quality products and, therefore, profitable new sales opportunities for businesses.”

Traditionally, NFL players must wear shoes without brand names and logos (beyond that of the shoe manufacturer) – it’s a fine of $6,076 for first-time infractions and $12,154 for subsequent ones. But the cleats sported by players last week featured all sorts of colorful logos, graphics and designs to raise awareness about issues such as domestic abuse, animal cruelty and rare diseases. NFL Auction has also allowed bidding on the shoes with 100% of the proceeds benefiting respective charities.

Ellsworth says customized footwear meshes well with the promotional product industry because it centers on memorability. “Custom branded shoes can be the next great thing that aligns with a campaign’s goals,” Ellsworth says. “Consider the following opportunities: customized footwear that supports a special cause for a charity run/walk, promotional footwear with a ‘Kick Cancer’ mantra that allows on-demand customization, promotional sneakers for a company’s event staff that will be on their feet all day or even custom shoes with a player’s name, number, or hashtag.”

However, Ellsworth warns that there are challenges to consider. “Footwear does bring in an element of sizing, so inventory risk for print on demand or in advance promotional opportunities can be costly,” he says. “The shoe fits when you have a good understanding of exactly who your customer is and what size they want.”

Here’s a look at several of the cleat designs that were worn by the players.

Netflix Recreates Lukes Diner to Promote Gilmore Girls Revival

On Wednesday, streaming giant Netflix transformed over 200 coffee shops across the country into the iconic Luke’s Diner, the fictional eatery made famous in the 2000s-era hit Gilmore Girls. Baristas donned aprons featuring the Luke’s Diner logo. Custom signage – including cardboard cutouts of Luke himself, played by actor Scott Patterson – completed the illusion.

Fans of the show lined up bright and early to nab a free cup of joe, decorated with special Luke’s Diner sleeves. Hiding under the sleeve were coffee-related quotes from the show’s fast-talking, java-loving stars. 

The effort was part of an elaborate marketing strategy to drum up interest for next month’s Netflix revival of the show, Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life. Reuniting Lauren Graham, Alexis Bledel and other cast members, the four-part series debuts November 25. Netflix’s nationwide promotion also had a social media element, with #LukesDiner trending on Twitter, and codes printed on the free custom coffee cups unlocking a special Snapchat filter for 24 hours.

This isn’t the first time Netflix has turned to promotional products to promote its original content. Earlier this year, the company gave out T-shirts, buttons and other swag bearing the slogan “FU ‘16” to promote the fourth season of House of Cards, in which corrupt politician Frank Underwood, played by Kevin Spacey, schemes his way into the Oval Office

T-Shirts Help Entice MLB Team to Stay in Town

For almost a decade, the Tampa Bay Rays have called Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, FL, home. However, in recent years, attendance at the stadium has steadily gone down. The stadium needs renovations, and, though they show tremendous support for their home team, the majority of Rays fans live more than 30 minutes away from Tropicana Field, making it difficult for them to attend games regularly.

The Rays asked St. Petersburg’s city council to allow the Major League Baseball team to search for a new location within the Tampa/St. Petersburg region to entice fans to return to the games. However, St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and Chris Steinocher, president of St. Petersburg Area Chamber of Commerce, wanted to persuade the Rays to stay at Tropicana Field; so, in addition to offering renovation aid, the summer-long “Baseball Forever” campaign was born.

Kriseman and Steinocher wanted to focus the campaign – which incorporated more than 700 imprinted “Baseball Forever St. Pete” T-shirts – on the St. Petersburg community, offering opportunities for local businesses to grow.

Through word of mouth, city council members connected with a local apparel decorator to design and imprint the baseball- and St. Pete-themed tees. The designer of the shirt says he was thrilled to help promote his hometown. “The mayor used this campaign to get the community behind him and showcase the excellent market in St. Petersburg,” he says.

The screen-printed “Baseball Forever” unisex short-sleeve T-shirts were given out at Sports Bar and Fan Fest, where the mayor spoke about the campaign and its benefits to the community. Fans also garnered the tees before and during baseball games.

The shirts became so popular that St. Petersburg’s Chamber of Commerce ordered more and started selling them at its St. Pete Store & Visitor Center and best of all, it looks like the “Baseball Forever” campaign has been working – the Rays have yet to leave the city of St. Petersburg.

ASPCA Promotes APP With Branded Items

Pet owners have to be extra careful during the summer months as their furry friends are more prone to go missing, drown in backyard pools or suffer from heat exhaustion after being left in parked vehicles.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) urges pet owners to prepare for such situations by downloading the Pet Safety App, which tracks lost pets and issues emergency alerts.

To entice downloads, the ASPCA, in conjunction with fashion and lifestyle blog MyBeautyBunny.com, is giving away a summer prize package full of promotional products. The package includes a tote bag, Frisbee, beach ball and towel – all emblazoned with the ASPCA logo – and a Subaru yoga mat.

The app provides a personalized missing pet recovery kit, including step-by-step instructions on how to search for a lost animal in a variety of circumstances. You can also build a lost pet digital flyer that can be shared instantly on social media channels. Additionally, you can store and manage your pet’s critical health records and access advice on what to do with your pet before, during and after a major storm, even if there’s no WiFi or data connectivity.

In order to enter the giveaway, pet owners (18 years or older) had to download the ASPCA mobile app and then submit their information through the Rafflecopter widget.

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